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HomeHealth & FitnessVIJAYA : THE KOHINOOR OF HERBS

VIJAYA : THE KOHINOOR OF HERBS

AYURVEDA

  • The earliest written reference to cannabis in India may occur in the Atharvaveda, dating to about 1500 BCE: “We tell of the five kingdoms of herbs headed by Soma; may it, and Kusa grass, cannabis and barley and the herb Saha makes us free from anxiety.
  • In the Sushruta Samhita (meaning the verses of Sushruta), perhaps dating from the third to the eighth centuries BCE, cannabis was recommended for phlegm, catarrh and diarrhea
  • Dwarakanath has maintained that cannabis was employed in Indian folk medicine in aphrodisiacs and treatments for pain in the same era , while Sanyal observed that “They also used the fumes of burning Indian Hemp (Cannabis Indica) as an anesthetic from ancient time.

A BACKGROUND ON VIJAYA IN INDIA

  • In the Sharangadhara Samhita, fresh extracts of bhang were employed medicinally, and it was linked to opium: “Drugs which act very quickly in the body first by spreading all over and undergoing change later are vyavayi; for example, bhanga, ahiphena” . Additionally, cannabis was cited as an intoxicant and employed as the primary ingredient in a therapeutic mixture of herbs: “This recipe known as jatiphaladi churna if taken in doses of one karpa, with honey, relieves quickly grahani (sprue [chronic diarrhea]), kasa (cough), swasa (dyspnoea), aruchi (anorexia), kshaya (consumption) and pratishyaya [nasal congestion] due to vata kapha (rhinitis)”. Inter- relationships of Tantra and Ayurveda in this work were explored by Sharma.
  • The 15th-century Rajavallabha, written by Sutradhar Mandan for Rana Kumhha of Mewar, attributed several additional qualities to cannabis [18]: “Indra’s food (i.e., ganja) is acid, produces infatuation, and destroys leprosy. It creates vital energy, the mental powers and internal heat, corrects irregularities of the phlegmatic humour, and is an elixir vitae. It was originally produced, like nectar from the ocean by the churning with Mount Mandara, and inasmuch as it gives victory in the three worlds, it, the delight of the king of the gods, is called vijaya, the victorious. This desire-fulfilling drug was obtained by men on the earth, through desire for the welfare of all people. To those who regularly use it, it begets joy and destroys every anxiety.”

THE INDIAN HEMP DRUGS COMMISSION REPORT

• 3,281 pages long.
• Testimony from almost 1,200 People
• Doctors
• Coolies
• Yogis & Fakirs
• Heads of lunatic asylums
• Bhang peasants
• Tax gatherers
• Army officers
• and more.

NAMES FOR CANNABIS IN SANSKRIT AND HINDI

• ajaya – the unconquered, invincible
• ananda – the joyful, joyous, laughter moving, bliss
• bahuvadini – causing excessive garrulousness
• bhang, bhanga – hemp, mature cannabis leaves
• bhangini – breaks three kinds of misery
• bharita – the green one
• capala – agile, capricious, mischievous, scatter- brained
• capta – light-hearted
• chapala – the light-hearted, causer of reeling gait, causer of vacillation
• charas – cannabis resin (hashish), either hand- rubbed or sifted
• cidalhada – gives happiness to mind
• divyaka – gives pleasure, lustre, intoxication, beauty
• dnayana vardhani – knowledge promoter
• ganja – unfertilized female cannabis flowers
• ganjakini – the noisy, vibrator
• gatra-bhanga – body disintegrator
• harshani – joy-giver
• harshini – the exciter of sexual desire, the rejoicer, delight-giver, causer of elation
• hursini – the exciter of sexual desire
• Indrasana – Indra’s food
• jaya – victorious, the conquering
• kalaghni – helps to overcome death
• madhudrava – helps excrete nectar
• madini – the intoxicator, sex intoxicator
• manonmana – accomplishes the objects of the mind

• matulani – wife of the datura
• matkunari – an enemy of bugs
• mohini – fascinating
• pasupasavinaini – liberates creatures from earthly bonds
• ranjika – causer of excitement
• sakrasana – the worthy food of Indra
• samvida manjari – flower causes garrulousness
• sana – cannabis
• sarvarogaghni – which cures all diseases
• sawi – green leaved
• Shivbhooty – Shiva’s plant
• siddha – which has attained spiritual perfection
• sidhamuli – on whose root is siddha
• siddhapatri – vessel of highest attainment
• siddhi – success giver
• siddhidi – which endows siddhi on others
• sidhdi – emancipation, beatitude, fruit of worship
• suknidhan – fountain of pleasures
• tandrakrit – causer of drowsiness
• trailokya vijaya – victorious in the three worlds, conqueror of the three regions of the universe
• trilok kamaya – desired in the three worlds
• ununda – the laughter mover
• urjaya – promoter of success
• vijaya – victorious, promoter of success, all- conquering
• vijpatta – the strong leaved
• virapattra – leaf of heroes
• vrijapata – strong nerved

NAMES FOR CANNABIS IN PERSIAN

  • Ali Gorji (personal communication, 2004) has recently consulted this work and added that it was helpful for stomach problems, nausea and uterine inflammation. Campbell , translated additional Persian names from this source: “Bhang is the Joy- giver, the Sky-flier, the Heavenly-guide, the Poor Man’s Heaven, the Soother of Grief”. Dymock and co-authors added a few more synonyms: “the inebriating leaf”, “fakir’s grass”, “the green tent” and “the throne giver”. Chopra and Chopra rendered another passage from the Makhzan as follows: “It is said that bhang is one of the best of God’s gifts, it is a cordial, a bile absorber, and an appetizer, and its moderate use prolongs life. It quickens the fancy, deepens thought and sharpens judgment.”
  •   Usage in Unani medicine at this time included treatment of insomnia, migraine, neuralgic pains, asthma, spasmodic conditions and previously noted gynecological conditions . A continued contribution to Islamic mysticism was also noted as cannabis use “frees them from worldly bonds, and induces communion with the divine spirit”

VARIETIES OF THE PLANT

  • INDUSTRIAL HEMP

There are many different varieties of the cannabis plant. Hemp — also called industrial hemp — refers to the non-psychoactive (less than 1% THC) varieties of Cannabis sativa L. Both hemp and Cannabis come from the same cannabis species, but are genetically distinct and are further distinguished by use, chemical makeup, and cultivation methods.

  • MEDICAL CANNABIS
  1. The Cannabis plant has a history of medicinal use dating back thousands of years across many cultures. Cannabis, called má (meaning “hemp; cannabis; numbness”) or dàmá (with “big; great”) in Chinese, was used in Taiwan for fiber starting about 10,000 years ago
  2. Emperor Shen-Nung, who was also a pharmacologist, wrote a book on treatment methods in 2737 BCE that included the medical benefits of cannabis
  3. Cannabis is one of the 50 “fundamental” herbs in traditional Chinese medicine
  4. Cannabis is found in over 80 traditional Ayurvedic formulas, several of which are available in pharmacies in India today

MEDICINAL CANNABIS IN WORLD RELIGIONS

  • SANATAN DHARMA / HINDUISM
  • ISLAM
  • JUDAISM
  • SIKHISM
  • TAOISM
  • BUDDHISM
  • MODERN

DIFFERENT PARTS OF THE PLANT THAT CAN BE USED

  • STALK – The Hurd of the stalk can be used to make animal beddings, mulch, – fibre-boards, Insulation and HempCrete (Organic Bio-Concrete which is made without the toxic cement) The fibres of the stalk provide raw material to produce hemp twine, ropes, netting, canvas, bio-composites, shoes, bags etc. The Stalk has the potential to substitute fuel, paper, textiles, plastic, construction materials and furniture
  • LEAVES – The cannabis leaves are rich in some of the medicinal compounds. It is one of the most important dietary supplement as it activates certain functions in the body which can prolong our good health
  • SEEDS – Hemp seeds contain nutritious polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) 80%. The highest amount found within the plant kingdom
  • FLOWERS – The flower produces all the resins and essential compounds which makes this plant one of the most medicinal herbs known to man

CURRENT MEDICAL APPLICATIONS

  • CANCER (20 KINDS)
  • NEUROLOGICAL  DISEASES
  • IMFALMMATORY  DISEASES
  • DIABETES / LIBIDO / AGEING
  • CARDIOVASCULAR / LUNG DISEASES
  • OBSTETRICAL & GYNAECOLOGICAL
  • SKIN / PRION DISEASES
  • BACTERIAL INFECTIONS
  • OSTEOPOROSIS
  • FEVER / WOUND / PAIN
  • AND MANY MORE…

CURRENT CANNABIS INDUSTRIAL APPLICATIONS

  • WOODEN FURNITURES
  • HEMP FIBREBOARD
  • PAPER
  • TEXTILE
  • HEMPCRETE
  • FUEL / BIO FUEL
  • FIBER
  • OIL
  • FOOD & AGRO
  • and more…

ANCIENT INDUSTRIAL USE

  • CONSTRUCTION
  • PAPER
  • TEXTILE
  • FIBER
  • OIL
  • FOOD
  • and more…

A BACKGROUND ON VIJAYA IN INDIA

  • Modern Day cannabinoid researchers have acknowledged the integral role that Indian culture has played in our understanding of the biochemistry of cannabis. Thus, the first endocannabinoid, arachidonylethanolamide, was dubbed anandamide (ananda is Sanskrit for bliss; In like manner, the most recently identified endocannabinoid, the cannabinoid antagonist O-arachidonylethanolamine, which is arachidonic acid and ethanolamine joined by an ester linkage, has been nicknamed virodhamine (virodha is Sanskrit for opposition)
  • The earliest written reference to cannabis in India may occur in the Atharvaveda, dating to about 1500 BCE : “We tell of the five kingdoms of herbs headed by Soma; may it, and kusa grass, and bhanga and barley, and the herb saha, release us from anxiety.” Grierson suggested this to be part of an offering, and ingestion or burning would both be typical of ancient practices for this purpose
  • In the Sharangadhara Samhita, fresh extracts of bhang were employed medicinally, and it was linked to opium: “Drugs which act very quickly in the body first by spreading all over and undergoing change later are vyavayi; for example, bhanga, ahiphena” . Additionally, cannabis was cited as an intoxicant and employed as the primary ingredient in a therapeutic mixture of herbs: “This recipe known as jatiphaladi churna if taken in doses of one karpa, with honey, relieves quickly grahani (sprue [chronic diarrhea]), kasa (cough), swasa (dyspnoea), aruchi (anorexia), kshaya (consumption) and pratishyaya [nasal congestion] due to vata kapha (rhinitis)”. Inter- relationships of Tantra and Ayurveda in this work were explored by Sharma.
  • The 15th-century Rajavallabha, written by Sutradhar Mandan for Rana Kumhha of Mewar, attributed several additional qualities to cannabis [18]: “Indra’s food (i.e., ganja) is acid, produces infatuation, and destroys leprosy. It creates vital energy, the mental powers and internal heat, corrects irregularities of the phlegmatic humour, and is an elixir vitae. It was originally produced, like nectar from the ocean by the churning with Mount Mandara, and inasmuch as it gives victory in the three worlds, it, the delight of the king of the gods, is called vijaya, the victorious. This desire-fulfilling drug was obtained by men on the earth, through desire for the welfare of all people. To those who regularly use it, it begets joy and destroys every anxiety.”
  • During the Renaissance European awareness of the psychoactivity of cannabis was kindled with the writings of Garcia da Orta, a Spanish Jew, who in the service of Portugal visited India in 1563. In addition to his descriptions of the plant as bangue, and a good illustration, he noted important medical properties , “The profit from its use is for the man to be beside himself, and to be raised above all cares and anxieties, and it makes some break into a foolish laugh.” In another passage, stimulation of energy and appetite was noted: “Those of my servants who took it, unknown to me, said that it made them so as not to feel work, to be very happy, and to have a craving for food.”
  •   The 18th century Persian medical text Makhzan-al-Adwiya, written by M. Husain Khan, was extremely influential in the Unani Tibbi, or Arabic-tradition medicine on the subcontinent. In it, cannabis was described in its various preparations as an intoxicant, stimulant and sedative, but also the following : “The leaves make a good snuff for deterging the brain; the juice of the leaves applied to the head as a wash, removes dandriff [sic] and vermin; drops of the juice thrown into the ear allay pain and destroy worms or insects. It checks diarrhea, is useful in gonorrhea, restrains seminal secretions, and is diuretic. The bark has a similar effect. The powder is recommended as an external application to fresh wounds and sores, and for causing granulations; a poultice of the boiled root and leaves for discussing inflammations, and cure of erysipelas, and for allaying neuralgic pains.”
  • The commission advocated against governmental suppression of cannabis drugs. Many positive statements accompanied descriptions of their religious associations, and particularly their legion medical usage, both human and veterinary : “It is interesting, however, to note that while the drugs appear now to be frequently used for precisely the same purposes and in the same manner as was recommended centuries ago, many uses of these drugs by native doctors are in accord with their application in modern European therapeutics. Cannabis indica must be looked upon as one of the most important drugs of Indian Materia Medica.”

THE SCIENTIFIC BASIS OF INDIAN CANNABIS CLAIMS

  •   The oldest cannabis claims are psychiatric from the Atharvaveda, citing its usage for anxiety. Current research is supportive, particularly for cannabidiol (CBD) as an anti-anxiety agent as well as an anti- psychotic . Similar benefit may accrue in calming dementia, as THC proved beneficial in Alzheimer’s disease patients . Recently, cannabichromene (CBC) has also demonstrated anti-depressant effects in an animal model. Additional support for benefits of cannabis on mood is evident from work demonstrating the regulation of extinction of aversive memories by the endocannabinoid system.
  •   Insomnia treatment is another ancient claim that finds documentation in modern phase II–III clinical-trial results in multiple sclerosis patients and those with chronic neuropathic pain . The 19th-century observation of benefit on addiction is echoed in modern studies of alcoholics and cocaine users , with experimental support for decreased use rates in clinical experiments for each.
  •   In the neurological realm, the ability of cannabis to treat pain, particularly of neuropathic origin, is the subject of a great deal of current research. Results to date are very encouraging, in terms of both basic science support and the benefits in clinical trials.
  • Although tetanus is rarely observed in the modern age of immunization, the observed benefits on muscle relaxation underlie current application to treatment of spasms and spasticity in multiple sclerosis and spinal cord trauma, where cannabis extracts have proven as effective as any currently available agent.
  • Indian medical literature on migraine treatment is also supportive, as is a tremendous amount of pathophysiological data and now the clinical researches support the same.
  •   Another long-held claim pertains to cannabis in epilepsy. Previous experimental work showed some support for CBD, but this has been greatly bolstered by current experiments by Wallace et al., demonstrating the anti-convulsant properties of THC, and the modulation of seizure thresholds by anandamide.
  • Examining additional ectodermal tissue, both eczema and itch were cited in Indian literature as benefiting from cannabis treatment. Recent work demonstrating the value of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) antagonists in psoriasis [98] may justify the use of cannabis, particularly CBD-rich extracts, in the treatment of related diseases, as CBD shares this mechanism of action [99]. Similarly, the benefits of THC on peripheral pain and itch are becoming increasingly evident
  • Rheumatic diseases cited by O’Shaughnessy and other authors remain an issue, but experiments underline the benefits of CBD in experimental rodent models of rheumatoid arthritis
  •   Modern investigation demonstrates that cannabinoid treatments definitely have a clinical role to play in issues of appetite, with benefit seen in HIV/AIDS subjects, and in multiple sclerosis/neuropathic pain patients
  • The role of cannabis in asthma has been much debated, but it is clear that THC is a bronchodilator , as is its terpenoid component, α-pinene , and that smooth muscle contraction in the lungs is mediated by endocannabinoids. Given these facts, plus the prominent anti-inflammatory benefits of THC, CBD and terpenoids non smoking treatment helps.
  • Although rabies remains invariably fatal, the neuroprotective effects of cannabis may warrant new trials of cannabis extracts in its treatment, and that of slow virus (prion) diseases.
  • The treatment of digestive issues with cannabis has figured prominently in India to the current day. Whether it be through reduction of intestinal spasms, constipation or inhibition of secretory diarrhea processes in cholera, cannabis components offer neuromodulatory amelioration. Given the combination of these factors mediated by THC, the TNF-α antagonism of CBD and the observed up-regulation of endogenous cannabinoids in human inflammatory bowel disease, there is every reason to believe that benefits will be forthcoming in clinical trials of cannabis extracts in Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. The gastritis claim finds support in studies documenting the benefit of cannabis in ulcer treatment, and the gastric cytoprotective effect of the cannabis essential-oil component, caryophyllene . Even claims for treatment of jaundice may find support in recent claimed benefits seen in hepatitis C patients who use cannabis.
  •   Hemorrhoids continue to plague mankind, and anecdotal evidence for the benefits of cannabis from rural Kentucky echo the Indian claims [117]. Myriad anti-inflammatory and anti-pruritic mechanisms may underlie the basis of such treatment.

DOCUMENTARY

  • Premise / Introduction
  • The Documentary is split into 3 sections after the introduction
  • Section 1: “Astitva” – Here the Sutradhaar, Dr. P Mishra, talks about her experience, and shares her research of past 3 years to set the base/foundation for the other 2 sections
  • Section 2: “Jivadatri” – Here the importance of Cannabis is showcased, not only to Mankind but in entirety
  • Section 3: “Sampatti” – Paper, Cloth, Cement, Food, Plastic, Bio-Fuel and Medicine are a few of the 50,000+ products where Cannabis / Hemp can be used
  • Each section is sub-divided into a mix of Obstacles, Confrontation, Action, Overcome, Resolution and Conclusion.

SOURCE OF CONTENT

  • DOCTORS – Their take on Cannabis, Busting some common myths, discussions of decades of development of medicinal cannabis, discussions about their patients
  • LAWYERS – Current Indian Laws, Laws in countries where cannabis is Legalised, Changes suggested in Indian Law.
  • CANNA-SCIENTISTS – Plant Science.
  • INDUSTRIAL SECTOR: Global Companies who manufacture Cannabis / Hemp based Products, Founders of those companies, Interviews that include the How? What? Why?
  • ACTIVISTS – Their Logic and Reasons, The actual fight!
  • PATIENTS – Their real stories, shedding light on the recovery process, How? What? Actual before and after Reports of Serious medical conditions being cured! The plea of patients and families.
  • GOVERNMENT AUTHORITIES – Their views, their study and information collected, What support can be provided, and how Cannabis can help the citizens and the country!

EPISODE LIST WITH CONTENT INFORMATION

• Introduction

• Pre-Historic Data

• Historic and Ancient Data

• Religious Connection Part 1

• Religious Connection Part 2

• Political Connection (Ban)

• Drug Cartels / Gangs

• Dark Era

• Countries it is legal in (Medicinal)

• Countries it is legal in (Medicinal & Recreation)

• Countries it is legal in (Industrial)

• Modern Science

• Diseases (Generic)

• Diseases (Palliative)

• Industrial Hemp

• Future Medicine

• and much more..

Special thanks Priya Mishra

Surendra sahuhttps://webinkeys.com
Hello humanity, My Name is Surendra and My job Profile Is Digital Marketing. If I say About my Self in One Word. Open hearted. But people are not.

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